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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Security in Car Parks SHARING IS Caring

Security in Car Parks

SHARING IS Caring: 

Security in Car Parks 

1. Always sensitive to surrounding conditions. Do park your vehicle at a distance if it is safer or nearby the lift, better safe than sorry. SAFETY's FIRST. 

2. Ask for the assistance or security guard to accompany you to the car park if the environment is dark or feel action is more secure. 

3. Make a habit to review the situation in the vehicle before entering. Although the possibility of a stranger is in your vehicle is small, but the act of showing your level of vigilance against any form of crime. 

4. Make sure you are ready with the keys in hand before approaching the vehicle. Avoid seen looking for something in the bag when in public places.  Else, indirectly provide opportunities for criminals to take advantage of you. 

5. Encouraged to act after entering the vehicle is to lock the door before starting the engine. Try to avoid delays, time in the open space and immediately left after business is finished.

SOURCE: Selangor Police.  Translated from Bahasa Malaysia.

Here's a link to a post about Chin Xin-Ci's narrow escape from being Kidnap @ The Curve, Mutiara Damansara.  She got mentioned some tips of how to escape the abductors.
1) http://www.kinkybluefairy.net/2012/05/girl-escapes-kidnapping-the-curve-mutiara-damansara/

2) https://www.facebook.com/notes/chin-xin-ci/30-hours-ago-i-escaped-from-being-kidnapped/10150980821959859

Here's an excerpt by Chin Xin-Ci:


"From this moment on, there were a few crucial things that happened that I think is the reason I’m alive today.
1. I managed to get into a position to escape.
 When they got into the car, the Indian man had tried to force my body down onto the floor. I knew that the moment I’m on the floor, there would be no chance of escape. So I begged him to let me sit up. I promised him I wouldn’t scream or alert anyone’s attention. Thankfully, he trusted me, and let me sit up, gripping my arm tightly. Then I told him my arm really hurt and to please not grip it so hard. He loosened his grip.
2. I did not fight for the sake of fighting.
 I was in an enclosed space, with no clear escape route. I would never win in a fight with these 2 guys, especially when they have sharp weapons. Had I fought from the get go, I may not have been in a position to escape. I might’ve even been knocked out cold, and God only knows where I would be right now.
3. I was lucky and sneaky.
I knew that the only way to escape, was to jump out of the car, even if it was moving. They had locked the car doors. So I leaned back, pretended to scratch my hair, and shakily unlocked the door I was leaning against. I’m so lucky they did not see or hear this!
4. I went ‘crazy’ at the right time.
And then I waited. I knew that the car would have to slow down outside the parking lot, as it exits to merge with the main roads. The moment it slowed down, I opened the car door and tried to make a run for it. I failed. I kicked my legs out of the car, but the Indian man had managed to pull my body back in. From this moment on, everything is a blur. I remember the Malay driver temporarily stopping the car, leaning over from the driver’s seat and attempting to close the door and pull my legs in. At that point I remember thinking, “Even if I don’t get out now, I need to keep the door open and my legs out the door. At the very least, it should cause a scene, and someone would see me. Or, the door might hit another car and they’ll be forced to slow down.” So I continued kicking. My right foot pushed against the wide-open car door to keep it open. I recall elbowing, struggling, kicking, and even biting. I lost my glasses, and was struggling blindly for my life. At some point the Malay driver yelled, “BAGI DIA LEPAS! BAGI DIA LEPAS!” (Let her go! Let her go!) and the Indian man loosened his grip. I made a jump out of the still-moving car, and ran for my life.
5. I acted in spite of the fear.
My friends said I was brave. But I didn’t feel like it. I was quivering and shaking in fear. I was so afraid. I thought I was going to die.  I was weak with fear and deathly afraid. I truly thought “this was it”. But I knew I HAD to move. I had to run. Or there would be a worser fate in store for me. While I was quaking in fear, I forced myself to look around and see if there was any way I could escape, or even catch someone’s eye.
6. I remembered the people I love.
The only thing that matters when you’re faced with potentially horrendous fate, is the people in your life. When I felt the knife to my neck, the first thing I thought was , “This cannot be happening. I must be dreaming.” The second? The people that truly matter to me flashed across my mind. It sounds cliche, but it’s true. I thought of my parents. My brother. Khailee. Esther. More people. That’s all I could think of for a few moments, before I thought, “Shit. I need to get out of here.”"

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